Level of Emergency

Localized emergencies such as small scale fires, landslides, canal breaches, and low level epidemics are usually taken care of at the district level. Such emergencies are generally considered as level 1 emergency. PDMA is responsible for level 2 emergencies that overwhelm the capacity of the district administration to manage the situation. A large scale disaster that calls for a response beyond the resources of the provincial government is known as a level 3 emergency. The Prime Minister declares an emergency in the case of a level 3 disaster. In case of level 2 and level 3 emergencies, PDMA activates its Command, Control and Communication Center. This Center generally knows as the 3C is equipped with latest communication and analytical technologies and brings together the representative of various line departments. PDMA utilizes the 3C to coordinate the response efforts among different governmental departments.

PDMA and departmental representatives in the 3C oversee the rescue and evacuation in the affected areas. They then plan the relief disbursement followed by a rapid assessment required to equip them with the knowledge required for a well-planned disaster response.  The assessment allows PDMA to deploy the current resources to the neediest places and request further assistance in case there is a gap between the assessed need s and the available resources. Throughout the governmental response PDMA would hold regular media briefings in consultation with the representatives of all line departments present at the 3C. PDMA would engage the armed forces in case their assistance or resources are required for a holistic response. The department is also responsible for ongoing coordination with the UN Agencies, CBOs and NGOs active in the field.

The declaration of emergency depends upon the nature and size of the disaster. In case the level of disaster requires resources that are beyond the capacity of the district administration, PDMA declares the emergency. There is no clear benchmark for declaring an emergency however if there is more than 50% loss of livelihoods; then an area is declared as "Calamity Affected" and resources are immediately deployed to prevent any further damage and attend to the needs of those affected. The following table provides examples of the different disaster situations in which an emergency should be declared.

The basic criteria for declaring an emergency for following hazards are as follows:

Tornado

  • Minimum 50% losses of livelihoods
  • Destruction of standing crops
  • Loss of livestock
  • Loss of human lives
  • Severe damage to infrastructure      
 

Drought

  • Crop failure
  • Livestock losses
  • Fodder crop failure
  • Loss of human lives

Earthquakes

  • Loss of livelihoods
  • Infrastructure damage
  • Standing crops/Fruit crops
  • Loss of livestock
  • Loss of storage foods
  • Loss of Human lives
 

Landslides

  • Loss of livelihoods
  • Standing crop/Fruits crop
  • Loss of livestock
  • Loss of stored food

Floods/Flash Floods

   
  • Minimum 50% losses of livelihoods e.g. standing crop damage, livestock loss, other small livelihoods sources
  • Loss of human lives
  • Severe damage to infrastructure